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The Eye-Ear/Heart/Hands (Feet) Metaphor

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The Framework

The Eye-Ear/Heart/Hand Metaphor is a theoretical framework that I often use for illustrating what is meant by an integrated human formation.  What is known or learned should become the basis for one’s decisions in life.  One’s decisions in life in turn are consolidated in one’s lifestyle.  Thus from one’s Worldview, the Life-Project is realized and the Lifestyle is formed.  This latter however can be known only retrospectively, that is, when one evaluates one’s life.   

In the Scriptures, the Feet and the movement of the feet (walking behind, walking neither to the left or right, etc.) constitute the metaphor for lifestyle.  For a Filipino audience, I use the image of the Hand following the image of the potter in the assumed in the word “formation”.

I have found the framework useful for recollections, retreats and for introductions to more technical courses like Moral Theology (Theology 104 in our schools).  I used to have a explanation of the illustration posted in one of my websites, but I can’t find it now.  And so I have posted an updated version of the article at Agustinongpinoy (in this location).  The article was posted as reference for my students in Moral Theology.

What is lacking in the article are biblical references.  These are biblical stories, sayings, and liturgical selections drawn from the lectionary where the relationship between the eye-ear, heart, hands (feet) are described.  I will add them later on.

 

Originally posted 2008-12-06 18:22:03. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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